THE WORLD WAR II PERIOD OF THE HOLINESS CHURCH: 1941 TO 1945
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, came as a devastating shock to all Americans. The anger and fear which this event caused was felt most strongly by Japanese-Americans living on the West Coast and Hawaii. The shock was magnified because of their ethnic and cultural identity with the nation which had shattered the peace. Added to these emotions was a devastating sense of shame and fear. In the face of the tensions and emotions across the land, Japanese-Americans felt somewhat defenseless and strained in their relationship with the general public. Immediately upon the outbreak of war, the FBI questioned the Los Angeles Church about Japanese language church activities. The FBI eventually decided that as long as the Bible was being taught, there was no problem whatsoever.

Within three days, 1,291 influential members of Japanese-American society—community leaders, ministers, former Japanese military officers, Japanese language-school teachers, and right-wingers—were among those arrested and incarcerated in special internment camps.


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